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Conferences

6th International Conference on Faculty Development in the Health Professions

“Faculty Development in Times of Extraordinary Change”

faculty-development-in-times-of-extraordinary-change

Conference Goals

  • To share and discuss how faculty developers promote and demonstrate adaptive expertise in the context of change
  • To address how faculty developers utilize change science/change management approaches in their work at individual and institutional levels
  • To provide a forum for shared learning across the global faculty development community


The 2 plenaries will focus on Goals #2 and #3. Each speaker will bring their own 'lens' to faculty development and change.
The plenary format will include opportunities for participants to ask questions and to engage in discussion about how this relates to their own work in faculty development.
 
The symposia will focus on Goals #1 and #3. Moderators will introduce the concept of adaptive expertise and its application to the practice of faculty development. Symposia presenters will share examples of their work that represent adaptive expertise in the context of change. There will be opportunities for participants to ask questions and to engage in discussion about how this relates to their own work in faculty development.
 

In support of the Goal #3 (really the most important one), the conference will run for 15 hours so that as many people from different time zones will be able to participate in synchronous sessions, as well as access the recorded content.

This means the conference will begin just after midnight GMT on Saturday August 28th (this will be the evening of Friday the 27th for those in the western-most countries) and run until the opening activities of the AMEE conference around 1600 hrs GMT. There will be 2 different plenaries, 2 different symposia and 2 timeslots for workshops and oral presentations. We anticipate 4 simultaneous tracks for workshops and OP sessions.


About the Conference

AMEE 2021 is now being planned as a virtual conference which will include synchronous and asynchronous learning (more details to follow).  We’ll also be linking to future activities including the AMEE FD Webinars and a new FD Journal club to build on learning from the conference.

Keep up-to-date with information relating to the conference on FacDev.org

Download the flyer

Plenary Speakers

Plenary #1 Eric Holmboe  
Conceptualizing Faculty Development as Co-produced Translational Science



Summary: Healthcare is ever changing as a result of advances in biological, clinical, educational, and systems sciences. As catastrophic as the  COVID-19 pandemic has been globally, the past 18 months also witnessed stunning developments in biological and clinical sciences. Healthcare delivery and health professions education systems learned to adapt, albeit more slowly.

Whether confronted with a sudden crisis or the more uneven paced nature of change, health professions faculty must continue to learn and more importantly apply new knowledge and skills. Faculty development represents an essential and broad suite of activities and processes that can enable continuous professional growth and help health professionals meet societal needs. As defined by Steinert, faculty development refers “to all activities health professionals pursue to improve their knowledge, skills, and behaviors as teachers and educators, leaders and managers, researchers and scholars, in both individual and group settings."

Faculty development is a complex intervention now recognized as a translational-type activity that continues to evolve. In this plenary, we will first explore key concepts such as knowledge and skill mobilization, mastery-based learning, learning and improvement cycles, and pertinent features of implementation science. The theory and science of co-production will be discussed as a mechanism to advance faculty development as an iterative, social process that can be integrated with continuous professional development needs to improve both educational and clinical skills. An example of co-production from an international faculty development learning community will be provided. Participants will have the opportunity to apply key translational science and co-production concepts in small groups.

Bio: Dr. Holmboe is Chief, Research, Milestones Development and Evaluation Officer at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). He is Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

He previously served as the Associate Program Director, Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program, Director of Student Clinical Assessment, Yale School of Medicine and Assistant Director of the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars program. Before joining Yale in 2000, he served as Division Chief of General Internal Medicine at the National Naval Medical Center. Dr. Holmboe retired from the US Naval Reserves in 2005.

His research interests include interventions to improve quality of care and methods in the assessment of clinical competence. His professional memberships include the American College of Physicians, where he is a Master of the College, Society of General Internal Medicine and Association of Medical Education in Europe. He is an honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in London, honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, and honorary fellow of the Academy of Medical Educators.

Dr. Holmboe is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College and the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He completed his residency and chief residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale University.


Plenary #2 Wim Gijselaers
All other things being equal: On the social connectedness of faculty development


Summary: Professionals socially connect and share whatever views and beliefs are essential to make a professional career and progress as an individual learner. But experienced professionals also coach, lead and serve as role models for young professionals entering an organization. They set standards for what is expected about the quality of services delivered, how young professionals should acquire expertise, and what they expect in terms of professional collaboration within an organization. Taken together, professionals constantly engage in signalling to others what is expected, tolerated, and not approved when doing their job. This can be considered as a process of social connectedness resulting in creating a learning climate: the degree to which individuals are afforded time, social, and monetary support for learning, as well as opportunities for applying new knowledge, challenging their colleagues' actions, and addressing errors.

Faculty Development plays an important role in all of this. It not only consists of policies for planned learning and development activities, but it also creates conditions for individual learning and provides platforms for social connectedness. These platforms reinforce the values and beliefs among experienced professionals about what is expected from them when delivering professional services and coaching and supervising young professionals. One way or the other, Faculty Development expresses how an organization values the importance of learning and development and how this is embedded in the career and work of a professional. 

In this presentation, I will pay attention to the work of our research group in the field of professional services firms: audit firms. Auditors assert whether an organization reports financial information in compliance with international auditing standards as well as national regulations. They operate in a highly regulated work environment forcing them to engage constantly in continuous learning and achieving the highest professional performance possible. We analysed how learning climate within the firm interacts with professional development and performance. Moreover, we researched how learning climate is influenced by senior leaders within the firm and how this determines how young professionals are coached and supervised by their seniors. Putting our findings in a faculty development framework shows that the effectiveness of training and development is determined by whether the firm’s leaders create an optimal learning climate. Finally, I will show how our findings connect to preparing professionals in the setting of health professions education.


Bio: Wim Gijselaers is a full professor in educational research, in the School of Business and Economics at Maastricht University, the Netherlands. His recent research focuses on leadership development, team dynamics, and how learning culture determines professional performance. His educational development work focuses on the further development of Problem-Based Learning in Business Education. Next to teaching in the award-winning Master program Learning and Development in Organizations, he teaches a course on change management in the post-graduate program Master of Medical Education at the University of Bern (Switzerland). Wim is a member of advisory boards of universities in Germany and Switzerland. Next, he is affiliated with the consulting firm Talent Miles (based in Helsinki). In this role, he has presented workshops for Scandinavian-based companies on topics of leadership development, and effects of learning culture on performance. He was the founding editor of the Springer Book Series Innovation and Change in Professional Education. He served positions as Program Director of International Business, and Associate Dean of Education. Currently, he is chair of the department of Educational Research and Development, at the School of Business and Economics (Maastricht University).


Symposiums

Symposium #1  


Presenters:
Jose Frantz (S Africa)The capability approach as a framework for faculty development: an exemplar from a SA university
The capability approach provides us with the opportunity to use it as a framework to evaluate faculty development initiatives. According to Sen the capability approach proposes that the well-being and quality of life of a person is related to the extent to which we have the opportunity to lead the kind of life that we value. Academics have been known to report their struggle to find a work-life balance and it is the role of the institution to provide an enabling environment. The aim was thus to create the opportunity for early career academics to take control of their life and space and broaden their thinking of what it is to be a research scholar. Part of the faculty development initiative was to address the personal, social and environmental triggers that would help participants create the kind of life they value. Conversion factors considered included personal attributes and skills and empowering decision-making skills regarding aspirations. 

Sharon Darlington (Australia)Engaging Casual Clinician Tutors in Peer Observation of Teaching: Insights from a mixed methods study'
Medical education relies heavily on clinician educators facilitating teaching, so it is vital to consider faculty development of these staff. Peer Observation of Teaching (POT) has become common practice in faculty development in higher education however there is limited research on the use of POT for clinicians working as sessional academic staff, or in small-group facilitation settings. This study involved clinician tutors of case-based learning (CBL) sessions for medical students and considered their perceptions of the benefits and barriers of virtual (video-recorded) POT.

A sequential, explanatory mixed methods study was conducted and all CBL tutors (80) were invited to complete a brief questionnaire and participate in two group interviews. Quantitative data from Likert scale questions examined tutors’ interest in participating in POT, their perceived value of POT and their concerns regarding the process. Qualitative data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis to explore tutors’ perceived benefits of the model and barriers to participation.
Tutors perceived value in being observed, observing another tutor, and in self-observation (via video). However just over half reported they were interested in participating in POT. A range of perceived benefits and barriers to participation were identified. Thematic analysis revealed that a POT programme, and staff engagement therein, should not be viewed in isolation. Rather it needs to be considered within the broader culture of faculty development and Communities of Practice within an institution

Dujeepa Samarasekera (Singapore)Rapidly Adapting Faculty Development support systems during COVID-19
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to strict measures to limit large group gatherings. Despite these limitations, it is important to continue to support both the faculty and students to develop their skills in learning and teaching. A rapid systematic literature review suggested that pivoting to an online delivery made up 53% of educational development due to COVID-19. (Gordon, 2020) The Centre for Medical Education (CenMED), National University of Singapore rapidly and effectively adapted new formats to prioritize upgrading of our faculty’s skills and students focusing on faculty development. The COVID-19 pandemic forced a shift in the delivery format of workshops and courses from face-to-face to virtual. Rather than an entirely online workshop conducted over Zoom or Microsoft Teams, CenMED introduced an online blended learning approach for its faculty development programme. Traditional blended learning is found to have a synergistic effect on face-to-face and online learning. Additionally, this format retains interpersonal communication and fosters flexibility in learning. (Heydari et al., 2019).
 
From April 2020, CenMED has also shifted from holding face-to-face activities to a blended learning approach. This was extended to conferences, student electives, the newly created “Pathways” program as well as the Medical Grand Challenge (MGC) competition. The faculty development activities were based on the Transformative learning theory (Mezirow, 1995) where Faculty members come with their own understandings and beliefs on the best ways to teach medical and health professional students. Our training focuses on developing/changing their teaching-learning assumptions and beliefs based on best-evidenced practices.
 
The sharing will focus on how we adapted, shared expertise and the effectiveness of the process as well as the limitations. CenMED efforts were acknowledged by winning the first place at the COVID Challenge Competition conducted among all departments, centres and units under the School of Medicine in 2021 for its effectiveness and value. This experience highlights how a school effectively responded to the pandemic situation in a timely manner to ensure a safe, effective, and continuous learning environment. Another highlight of this experience is the importance of educators, administrators and students’ commitment, responsibility and resilience, which was on display during this time of crisis in order to develop a quality learning environment. We hope this example serves as a good reference for adapting to a crisis situation, sharing of expertise and the importance of maintaining continuity of the learning environment, which would better prepare institutions of similar settings for future pandemics.
 

Moderator: Sandrijn M. van Schaik

Bio: Sandrijn M. van Schaik, MD PhD is Professor of Pediatrics with a clinical appointment in the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at UCSF. She is the inaugural Baum Family Presidential Chair for Experiential Learning and serves as the Education Director of UCSF’s Simulation Center. She also is the Director of Faculty Development for the Learning and Caring Environment in the Center for Faculty Educators at UCSF, vice-Chair for Education in the Department of Pediatrics and the Fellowship Director for pediatric critical care medicine. Her research in the domains of interprofessional collaboration and communication, simulation, and faculty development has been published in premier educational research journals. In 2018, she co-authored a vision paper commissioned by the Macy Foundation for the Foundation’s consensus conference on learning environments in the health professions and she is currently leading efforts locally and nationally to improve clinical learning environments. She is the recipient of numerous teaching and mentoring awards, and a member of the UCSF Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educators.

 

Symposium #2 


Presenters:
Floor Velthuis (Netherlands) Faculty development in times of curriculum change
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to strict measures to limit large group gatherings. Despite these limitations, it is important to continue to support both the faculty and students to develop their skills in learning and teaching. A rapid systematic literature review suggested that pivoting to an online delivery made up 53% of educational development due to COVID-19. (Gordon, 2020) The Centre for Medical Education (CenMED), National University of Singapore rapidly and effectively adapted new formats to prioritize upgrading of our faculty’s skills and students focusing on faculty development. The COVID-19 pandemic forced a shift in the delivery format of workshops and courses from face-to-face to virtual. Rather than an entirely online workshop conducted over Zoom or Microsoft Teams, CenMED introduced an online blended learning approach for its faculty development programme. Traditional blended learning is found to have a synergistic effect on face-to-face and online learning. Additionally, this format retains interpersonal communication and fosters flexibility in learning. (Heydari et al., 2019).
 
From April 2020, CenMED has also shifted from holding face-to-face activities to a blended learning approach. This was extended to conferences, student electives, the newly created “Pathways” program as well as the Medical Grand Challenge (MGC) competition. The faculty development activities were based on the Transformative learning theory (Mezirow, 1995) where Faculty members come with their own understandings and beliefs on the best ways to teach medical and health professional students. Our training focuses on developing/changing their teaching-learning assumptions and beliefs based on best-evidenced practices.
 
The sharing will focus on how we adapted, shared expertise and the effectiveness of the process as well as the limitations. CenMED efforts were acknowledged by winning the first place at the COVID Challenge Competition conducted among all departments, centres and units under the School of Medicine in 2021 for its effectiveness and value. This experience highlights how a school effectively responded to the pandemic situation in a timely manner to ensure a safe, effective, and continuous learning environment. Another highlight of this experience is the importance of educators, administrators and students’ commitment, responsibility and resilience, which was on display during this time of crisis in order to develop a quality learning environment. We hope this example serves as a good reference for adapting to a crisis situation, sharing of expertise and the importance of maintaining continuity of the learning environment, which would better prepare institutions of similar settings for future pandemics.

Susan Jamieson (UK) Meeting a learning need: a Microcredential to upskill teachers in Scottish healthcare professions
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to strict measures to limit large group gatherings. Despite these limitations, it is important to continue to support both the faculty and students to develop their skills in learning and teaching. A rapid systematic literature review suggested that pivoting to an online delivery made up 53% of educational development due to COVID-19. (Gordon, 2020) The Centre for Medical Education (CenMED), National University of Singapore rapidly and effectively adapted new formats to prioritize upgrading of our faculty’s skills and students focusing on faculty development. The COVID-19 pandemic forced a shift in the delivery format of workshops and courses from face-to-face to virtual. Rather than an entirely online workshop conducted over Zoom or Microsoft Teams, CenMED introduced an online blended learning approach for its faculty development programme. Traditional blended learning is found to have a synergistic effect on face-to-face and online learning. Additionally, this format retains interpersonal communication and fosters flexibility in learning. (Heydari et al., 2019).
 
From April 2020, CenMED has also shifted from holding face-to-face activities to a blended learning approach. This was extended to conferences, student electives, the newly created “Pathways” program as well as the Medical Grand Challenge (MGC) competition. The faculty development activities were based on the Transformative learning theory (Mezirow, 1995) where Faculty members come with their own understandings and beliefs on the best ways to teach medical and health professional students. Our training focuses on developing/changing their teaching-learning assumptions and beliefs based on best-evidenced practices.
 
The sharing will focus on how we adapted, shared expertise and the effectiveness of the process as well as the limitations. CenMED efforts were acknowledged by winning the first place at the COVID Challenge Competition conducted among all departments, centres and units under the School of Medicine in 2021 for its effectiveness and value. This experience highlights how a school effectively responded to the pandemic situation in a timely manner to ensure a safe, effective, and continuous learning environment. Another highlight of this experience is the importance of educators, administrators and students’ commitment, responsibility and resilience, which was on display during this time of crisis in order to develop a quality learning environment. We hope this example serves as a good reference for adapting to a crisis situation, sharing of expertise and the importance of maintaining continuity of the learning environment, which would better prepare institutions of similar settings for future pandemics.

Klodiana Kolomitro (Canada)Professional Development of Faculty Developers: Crossroads and Opportunities’  
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to strict measures to limit large group gatherings. Despite these limitations, it is important to continue to support both the faculty and students to develop their skills in learning and teaching. A rapid systematic literature review suggested that pivoting to an online delivery made up 53% of educational development due to COVID-19. (Gordon, 2020) The Centre for Medical Education (CenMED), National University of Singapore rapidly and effectively adapted new formats to prioritize upgrading of our faculty’s skills and students focusing on faculty development. The COVID-19 pandemic forced a shift in the delivery format of workshops and courses from face-to-face to virtual. Rather than an entirely online workshop conducted over Zoom or Microsoft Teams, CenMED introduced an online blended learning approach for its faculty development programme. Traditional blended learning is found to have a synergistic effect on face-to-face and online learning. Additionally, this format retains interpersonal communication and fosters flexibility in learning. (Heydari et al., 2019).
 
From April 2020, CenMED has also shifted from holding face-to-face activities to a blended learning approach. This was extended to conferences, student electives, the newly created “Pathways” program as well as the Medical Grand Challenge (MGC) competition. The faculty development activities were based on the Transformative learning theory (Mezirow, 1995) where Faculty members come with their own understandings and beliefs on the best ways to teach medical and health professional students. Our training focuses on developing/changing their teaching-learning assumptions and beliefs based on best-evidenced practices.
 
The sharing will focus on how we adapted, shared expertise and the effectiveness of the process as well as the limitations. CenMED efforts were acknowledged by winning the first place at the COVID Challenge Competition conducted among all departments, centres and units under the School of Medicine in 2021 for its effectiveness and value. This experience highlights how a school effectively responded to the pandemic situation in a timely manner to ensure a safe, effective, and continuous learning environment. Another highlight of this experience is the importance of educators, administrators and students’ commitment, responsibility and resilience, which was on display during this time of crisis in order to develop a quality learning environment. We hope this example serves as a good reference for adapting to a crisis situation, sharing of expertise and the importance of maintaining continuity of the learning environment, which would better prepare institutions of similar settings for future pandemics.
 

Moderator: Maria Mylopoulos

Bio: Dr. Maria Mylopoulos holds her PhD in human development and education. She is currently Scientist and Associate Director of the Wilson Centre for Research in Education, Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics and Curriculum Scientist in the MD Program at the University of Toronto. Over the last 13 years she has successfully led a program of research aimed at understanding the development and performance of adaptive expertise in medicine, with a particular focus on how health professionals deal with uncertainty, novelty and complexity in their daily clinical problem solving. The aim of her research is to evolve understanding of the knowledge and capabilities that underpin this facet of expertise as it occurs in real-world contexts using theoretical frameworks of clinical reasoning and adaptive expertise. The ultimate goal of her research is to translate this understanding to educational design that promotes the development of exceptional clinicians who are able to handle the complexities and challenges of the healthcare workplace.



Presentation Formats

6th International Conference on Faculty Development in the Health Professions
 
The 6th ICFDHP is a virtual conference where all sessions scheduled in the programme will be presented entirely live through the Swapcard platform. We are currently scheduling the sessions and where possible will try to ensure that these are at times that suit presenters. However, due to the international nature of the conference, this may not always be possible particularly if a session has multiple presenters from very different time zones. We will email presenters by 14 May to indicate the approximate time of the session.
 
All presenters are asked to confirm to [email protected] by 31 May that they accept the presentation as offered. Presenters should also register for AMEE 2021 and pay the registration fee by 30 June.
 
All sessions (with the exception of workshops) will be recorded in real time including questions from the audience and responses from the speakers, so that participants may view the entire session later in the conference and up to one year afterwards. Abstracts of all presentations will be available from mid-August.
 
Workshop
90 minute live session in a Zoom room. Workshop participants will be asked to enable their cameras. Workshops should be highly interactive and breakout rooms are available. No advance recording is required and presenters will be able to share their screens. Workshops will not be recorded. The lead presenter will be contacted to discuss the group’s requirements and support will be given to try out presentations on the Swapcard platform in advance. Support will also be available on the day.
 
Oral Presentation
90 minute live session in a Zoom room, with four presentations. Each presenter has 10 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for questions and discussion led by a session moderator. No pre-recorded videos are required and presenters are asked to give their presentation live by sharing their screen. The whole session will be recorded and available for conference participants to view later in the conference and up to one year afterwards. There will be the opportunity to try out the Swapcard platform in advance of the session and support will be available on the day. Detailed instructions will be provided.
 
Symposium
90 minute live session in a Zoom room. No pre-recorded videos are required and presenters are asked to give their presentation live by sharing their screen. The whole session will be recorded and available for conference participants to view later in the conference and up to one year afterwards. The lead presenter will be contacted to discuss the group’s requirements and support will be given to try out presentations on the Swapcard platform in advance. Support will also be available on the day.

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